Are you bold enough to follow God when no one else will?

Something incredibly revealing happened at the WSU vs. KU game last Sunday, and it had very little to do with sports. I don’t talk about politics very often, mostly because my opinions and beliefs usually vary from everyone I know.

The last thing I want to do is offend anyone. The last thing I want to do is start up a huge ugly conversation about topics nobody has researched enough to truly understand. But what happened at the game stunned me, and what happened afterward made me really sad.

Governor Brownback was sitting in the stands, watching the game. And the moment the camera focused on him, the whole stadium started booing. It was obvious. It wasn’t just one or two people. The noise was so loud, the announcers had shout to hear over it.

I’m not going to sit here and say that Governor Brownback is perfect. I’m not even going to sit here and tell you I agree with all of his decisions. But what I will tell you is that he is the current Governor of Kansas, and that didn’t happen by accident. And you’d think that a Christian would know that.

Obviously, the stadium wasn’t full of Christians, but after it happened? Christians and non-Christians alike were all over social media rejoicing. “Wasn’t it great how we all booed the governor?” and “That was the best part of the night!”

Is that how Christians are supposed to act?

Maybe you don’t like him. Maybe you don’t like his politics. Maybe you don’t like the choices he’s made, but you know what? If you’re a Christ-follower, you have been commanded to respect our elected officials, whether you like them or not, whether you voted for them or not.

More than just respect, though. And more than simply not disrespecting them too. Christ-followers are supposed to pray for our leaders.

brownbackToday’s verse is 1 Timothy 2:1-4.

I urge you, first of all, to pray for all people. Ask God to help them; intercede on their behalf, and give thanks for them. Pray this way for kings and all who are in authority so that we can live peaceful and quiet lives marked by godliness and dignity. This is good and pleases God our Savior, who wants everyone to be saved and to understand the truth.

This isn’t the only verse in the Bible about respecting our elected officials. There are lots more where that came from.

You did realize you’re supposed to be praying for our leaders, right? Not just the leaders in your church. Not just your boss. But the governor and the senator and the representatives and the president. Americans don’t have kings really (although some people might disagree), but we do have governmental leaders. And that’s what this verse is about–praying for those people.

When was the last time you prayed for Governor Brownback? Maybe you’re bold enough to stand up in a stadium and boo him and act disrespectful because it’s the popular thing to do. But are you bold enough to stand up and exclaim that you don’t agree with him but that you will pray for him because he is the one God allowed to win the election?

It’s easy to go along with the crowd, but are you a Christian or not? If you’re a Christian, why don’t you do what God has told you to do?

It’s not easy. It’s hard. You have to give up things you want. You have to let go of dreams sometimes. And, yes, you have to submit to elected officials you don’t like. But would you rather bear up and trust that God has control of everything? Or do you find it better to be childish and throw a temper tantrum when you don’t get your way?

It’s time to grow up, Christians. Dark days are coming. Darker days than any of us have ever seen before, and we need to get our eyes on what matters.

God has told us what He expects of us, and I’m pretty sure “behaving like spoiled brats” didn’t make His list.

65 Comments

    1. Get out more. Booing ain’t that bad, ain’t that rude, and ain’t really indicative of a lack of education. Booing is just a crowd’s way of showing disapproval… throwing a shoe, that would’ve been over the line.

      Or think about history a little. I mean, I might go out on a limb and call the American Revolution unchristian, but I’m guessing you might have some reservations. Or how about the protests of the Vietnam War? Didn’t live back then, but forced conscription into service for a war that then (and more so in hindsight but of course it’s still arguable) was a bad idea… that sounds like a reasonable time to show a little disdain for your leaders. Sometimes the voice of a group of people is literally their voice. It’s really not that “rude.”

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  1. Thank you so much for this. It truly made me mourn for what our world is coming to. I am a Kansas girl, who now lives in Pennsylvania. When I aw Brownback on TV I was like, “Hey, that’s our governor!” But before I could say anything, I heard all the booing and, soon, the hundreds of blog posts that came out just hours later of how he deserved what he got.
    No one should act like that, especially Christians. Thank you for speaking up.

    Caitlin

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  2. That’s great, except he’s actively ruining our state. Yes, he had the most votes of governor candidates, but more Kansans voted for someone else than voted for him. I support a crowd of people who aren’t having their voices heard using media to let the nation know we don’t stand behind this terrible, ungodly man.

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    1. Nowhere in scripture does it say it is ok to publicly ridicule our leaders. It does however say, do unto others as you would have them do unto you. That is not a conditional statement based on their performance.

      I would like to address this event from one other angle. Other than making Kansas look totally devoid of manners before the nation, ( in my neck of the world, we call it ” being poorly raised”),what did this display of rudeness accomplish?
      If it was supposed to convince me to support spending more on education, it was counter productive. Because if these are the type citizens produced by public education, we need to do away with it entirely. Clearly it is producing brainless mobs that don’t understand how to voice dissent in acceptable ways. This is how we end up with events like Ferguson MO. We have too many other ways to voice our disapproval of government officials that are both more effective, and less demeaning.
      BUT before you get yourself in a knot about having a right to be heard, or express yourself in any way you want, I would like to remind you there were two people in that picture of Brownback. Two people shown on the jumbotron that night.Two people who were publicly humiliated by booing that night. Mrs Brownback is not an elected official, and like any human being she has a right to be treated with respect, yet she received a public booing. So where are all the apologys she is owed. Every person who publicly declared Brownback got what he deserved, should be just as publicly humbly seeking her forgiveness for delivering an undeserved public shaming.
      So before you decide to support this behavior in the name of “being heard”, you better figure out how you can justify the harm of innocent by standers who get caught in the crossfire. So get back to me with that public apology copied and pasted to you response, your FB, and anywhere else you publicly stated you opinion that this occurance was justified.

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      1. Sensitive much? If Jesus were in the stands, he might have walked up to Browback and tossed his concessions everywhere, just like he did in the temple with the “moneychangers”. He took the Pharisees and other “leaders” to task as well. I’m sure they all had wives and “innocents” with them as well.

        Where in scripture does it say to act like a lamb in the face of injustice? Where in the Constitution does it say that you can’t express yourself? You are WAY off.

        And to compare this to Ferguson? Wow.

        I agree with one point. If your thoughts on this are indicative of large swaths of people, then yes, public education needs some serious help.

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      2. Why would anyone be booing Mrs. Brownback? Those boos were aimed squarely at her husband who IS an elected official. Stop allowing the governor to hid behind his wife’s skirt!

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    2. I happen to know that the governor is a very godly man with a strong faith, doing what he thinks is right for Kansas. Just because you don’t agree with him is no reason to call him names and question his motives, or to make Kansas look bad on national TV.

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  3. I agree…leaders should be respected and prayed for. As a Christian, I seek to pray for leaders I agree with and leaders I don’t.

    But I can’t help but laugh when, living in the most red of red states, there is this outrage about Governor Brownback when he has been booed. President Obama, and most Democrats, can only hope to get off with booing from most Christians.

    Will Christians repent for the hateful and slanderous things that have been said about Obama, the Clintons, Nancy Pelosi, and the like through most of my lifetime?

    Will Christians turn off Fox News when ‘fair and balanced’ means little more than a token defender of the President while their hosts make endless and unsubstantiated allegations about him and his political allies?

    Will Christians stop gleefully listening to hour upon hour of Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and the like, who are little more than hatchet men who know that their mostly ‘Christian’ audiences love to hear mocking and salacious attacks on their political enemies?

    Living in a red state, I can guarantee that it takes a lot more ‘courage’ and ‘boldness’ to speak against the poor policies of Brownback, the Koch brothers, and their political allies than it does to boo a governor at a basketball game. Especially at church, when many of my fellow Christians feel that tea partyism is equivalent to Christianity.

    So I agree…what happened was distasteful. But until I hear ‘Christian’ people start to be more proper and righteous with their words (and not behave like ‘spoiled brats’…conservative Christians live with far more of a delusion of entitlement than anybody I know, but that’s for another time), I’ll not really take what you said seriously.

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  4. Hi Amy, First time have I read your blog. This article was posted on Facebook by a friend. I wonder if you would have written with the same passion (or at all) if Obama was the focus of the jeers and the comments that followed. I agree with you, but the stuff I have seen Christians say about Obama on social media is far more offensive than some jeering from a crowd at a basketball game.

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    1. I agree we all are no more respectful of Obama or any of his programs, Obamacare, and still we live in the richest country in the world and we don’t take care of our lower income families or seniors…give me a break.

      My husband and I grieved when Brownback won because it wasn’t by many votes…same with Pat Roberts and Heulschamp…and yet NONE of these three have done much in an attempt to work across the isle…it’s just too bad that Kansas has moved so far to the right politically…we used to have the common sense politicians ( both sides) that could work together with Democrats to get something done.

      Kansans need to READ MORE than just the main stream media sources and get out and vote….vote for the common sense people that can work together to solve problems.

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  5. I am a Kansan, a registered Republican, amd a long-time teacher. I, too, felt a sense of “Yeah, that’s right, Governor! This is how you’ve turned our state upside down!” when I heard the boo’s. Thank you for humbling me with your words and reminding me to truly walk by faith AT ALL TIMES even when I feel hurt by another. In these times of quick-response-social-media-reactions, it IS my Christian duty to treat others respectfully AT ALL TIMES. I will continue to pray for all politicians to make godly decisions.

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      1. Well that was a petty remark. Hope others don’t hold you to your own high standards. I feel she’s had the best response on this entire thread. (I also hope I used proper grammar and punctuation as not to end up berated by you.) Pretentious much?

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  6. Typical attempt to make those that know the difference between right and wrong, feel that they are wrong by throwing religion into the mix. Why can’t anyone own the fact that our so called “Christian” conservative is a sellout fraud? Does it really make you suddenly not a Christian to question people and/or things, or facts for that matter? I guess so. Just like questioning the policy of the Israeli government makes you anti semitic, I suppose. What fools we have become.

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    1. I think there is a huge difference between questioning a persons policy, even integrity and publicly booing them. I did vote for Brown back and detest most of his policy, but find myself reviewing my own thoughts on the booing. I don’t recall anywhere in this blog where the writer said you were not a Christian if you joined in, nor did she say one shouldn’t question. She is.ply reminded us that as Christians we are called to obey the scripture, and in this instance, perhaps we did not.

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  7. Kansas was ruined by his predecessor before she went on to take a swing at the entire country. And you are wrong. He is a Godly man and that is what fuels much of the hate. The problem lies in the fact that everyone is screaming for him to fix what was broken….but they don’t want it taken from their piece of the pie.

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    1. L. He hides behind the cloak of being a Godly man. He is far from it and the way his group treats people is anything but Christian. He likes to tout his “Christian Lifestyle” in the media and Kansans that want it to be true so bad, ignore the rest of the red flags floating around him. I worked under his staff for the State after his election. I’m a longtime republican and very active participant at my church who likes to consider myself a good Christian. I voted for Sam in his initial election, because I agree with some of the same political principles as him. But, I chose to quit less than 2 years (even though I was asked to stay and take a leadership position) into his term due to a lack of basic dignity shown by him and his appointed staff towards anyone they viewed to be outside of their train of thought or beneath them in a way that wouldn’t further them along in power and money.

      Here’s one of many examples I can provide of this “Christian/Godly” administration. The straw that broke the camel’s back with me was an incident involving some layoffs. We had an idea that layoffs were coming that particular week and I asked that Thursday afternoon if there was anything I should be prepared for the next day. I was told over and over that there was nothing to worry about. I was told “you’re safe don’t worry”. I told them it wasn’t my job I was worried about. If they were going to do layoffs in mass and it was going to involve people I call my friends, I’d just like to be prepared emotionally. I was told that it was just rumor…everything is good. The next morning I got to the office and I was immediately taken to a conference room. I was told that they were going to be doing mass layoffs of around 25 individuals that work in our department and by the way…Here are their letters, you will be doing the layoffs…let us know if you have any issues. First off…of the 20+ individuals, only 3 actually worked for me as their manager. It was one of the lowest, cowardly moves I’ve ever witnessed. They went even lower after the fact though. Once those people laid off went and applied and/or got hired by other State agencies, they called those State agencies and told the other agencies not to hire them or get rid of them. That’s right…they took time to call and try and keep individuals from getting a new job. They were not let go due to performance reasons, but simple fiscal reasons…per their layoff letter.

      Working for several administrations, I can tell you this. It was THE ABSOLUTE worst, most hate-filled environment I’ve ever been a part of and it made me question my values that I would be associated with such a group. Anyone defending him is one of three things. 1. A direct benefactor from his political rise. 2. Completely out of the loop from a news perspective and has had no firsthand experience with him and his people. 3. Or they’re so blinded by their political affiliation that they would support a brick if it was a part of their party.

      I couldn’t disagree more with people calling him “Godly or Christian”. He’s a chameleon that will change to fit whatever drives him towards more power and money.

      Simple booing is a form of speech that is non-violent and intended to show displeasure. There was nothing wrong or disrespectful regarding that. Had someone confronted him and his family, yelled obscenities and/or threw things at him…I would have had a problem with it.

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      1. LB it is very easy for you to make such accusations under aninimity. As I have learned over the years, there are always two sides to

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      2. Sorry my post sent before it was complete

        I was saying there are 2 sides to every story. The state has close to 20k employees and to blame the Governor for the actions you have described seems pretty unreasonable.

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      1. only because she stole from our water defense fund and other pooled monies that are now used up and we have nothing to use to defend our state’s water need from Colorado etc. No shortfalls, because she robbed peter blind to pay paul!

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      2. If Sebelius taking money from the water defense fund to shore up the budget during the national recession upsets you, you much REALLY be upset with Brownback ‘stealing’ money from KDOT to shore up his own SELF-INFLICTED budgetary crisis!!!

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  8. I think they were booing his unchristian politics, not him as a person. Nonviolent political statements that support the gospel shouldn’t be deemed disrespectful. I pray for our elected officials often.

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  9. I have the pleasure of working for Governor Brownback and I am deeply appreciative of your thoughtful article. I have been engaged in politics starting at the grassroots for close to 15 years and I have never met a more thoughtful, kind and genuine person.

    I would also be more than happy to visit with the previous poster to discuss issues that he is concerned over regarding the Governor’s policies. He can call the main number and my staff can set that up. I have found that far too many folks are making opinions based on faulty information. I welcome Steve’s call.

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  10. Just goes to show how many people think they know the truth because they heard it on TV or in the newspaper. This Brownback hate is coming chiefly from the Kansas City Star and Wichita Eagle, which are both owned by the same company, McClatchy. When one company owns the two largest daily newspapers in the state and they spend enormous vats of ink denigrating someone, then unless citizens are smart enough to know better, it is going to have an effect. The criticism of Gov. Brownback is based on lies and exaggerations. And know this: Were he for abortion on demand throughout all 9 months of pregnancy, like the editorial writers of both newspapers are, this would not be happening.

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    1. I understand those who view Pro-life as the modern day abolitionist movement. The above comment reminds me of the chant at the Operation Rescue Summer of Mercy gathering at the WSU football stadium. The crowd began shouting at the media: “Tell the Truth”. In politics the truth always seems to be the first casualty. If the crowd booed then they booed. News reports on replacing the School Finance Formula with block grants may have been a factor for some, but I doubt every person booing was doing so for identical reasons.

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  11. Where in the bible does it say “do not tax the rich” and “refuse healthcare to the poor”. His policies do not reflect Christian values. Jesus taught people to feed the poor, clothe the needy and treat the sick. He has cut tax exemptions for food tax, refused to expand medicaid with free fed dollars, is cutting funding to poor and rural school districts, & lies during campaigning (pro education gov???). He does not act Christian.

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    1. The Bible makes it clear that it is the responsibility of the church to take care of people – not the government. Your ideas come from a Socialist ideology.

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  12. In scripture it says to feed the hungry and clothe the naked. Since when is it LESS Christian to show disapproval for someone who directly conflicts with those sacred teachings JESUS HIMSELF TALKED ABOUT, than to sit silently and vote party lines to cut funding to social programs. Stop saying we’re a Christian nation. We may be a nation of Christians, but cutting funding to programs that help the poor is NOT Christian.

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  13. I would like to hear both Amy’s (this blog writer) and Kim’s (the staffer) response to David’s comment. If the issue is truly frustration over Christians’ behavior towards elected officials, then I wonder why the outrage doesn’t include behaviors towards Democrats as well.

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    1. MG,
      I think this article did a great job in addressing what Christians are called to do even if we dont agree with those in office. It was a wonderful reminder to me to pray for the President even though I disagree with his politics.

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  14. It is very likely true that dark days are on the horizon for Christian. But not in the way you might suppose. Those dark days will be only for the fundamentalist parents of young people who see through the lies of a foolish faith far past its prime. As young people wake up to the fact that the faith of their fathers is nothing more than a fairy tale designed to fill all the emotional holes of those unwilling to face reality, Christian parents are going to feel the “persecution” of marginalization as those children mature to become scientifically and rationally literate leaders in an age where you can’t get away with making things up. Let’s take a brief look at biblical logic.

    “Does he who fashioned the ear not hear? Does he who formed the eye not see?” (Psalms 94:9)

    Based on this, what does he he fashioned sexual organs do? Is this a book authored by an actual creator of logic?

    Or consider whether an actual god of the universe would deem eternal torment the only appropriate punishment for a single offense. Children of Evangelicals know their parents would never dream of eternally tormenting them, no matter how god-like they became.

    It is this sad (if noble) hypocrisy that opens the eyes of the many children of Evangelicals. They love and respect their parents, but realize their parent’s entrenched false ideology will need to die with them.

    Those parents will, unfortunately feel persecuted all of their remaining days, perhaps glorying in the notion that such persecution will win them crowns in Heaven. And they will die not ever able to participate in a society that is moving ever more closely to a world where empathy and and understanding is the dominant force rather than the rather disturbing satisfaction that all those who reject what you believe will be tortured forever without you ever shedding a tear.

    The nonsense of the Bible is on the way out. I’m guessing it will be a bumpy transition into a more rational world, where we have to actually understand each other to figure out how to balance our interests rather than supposing that some silly god who once condoned slavery has given you the inside secret to moral truth. But today’s children will no longer swallow the lies of the Evangelicalism found deep in the veins of their parents. That foolish ideology will likely die incrementally on the dying lips of each well-meaning but faith-blinded parent.

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    1. I am constantly surprised that the secular “thinkers” have yet to get their minds around the fact that their so called “reason and logic” was responsible, in the 20th Century, for more death and suffering than all other religions and political causes in history.
      Your assertion that “The nonsense of the Bible is on the way out. I’m guessing it will be a bumpy transition into a more rational world, where we have to actually understand each other to figure out how to balance our interests rather than supposing that some silly god who once condoned slavery has given you the inside secret to moral truth.” has one major flaw, and that is that the “God” you so lightheartedly ridicule actually exists, and will take an active role to preserve both His Word and His people, even though we will have, and already have, much persecution.
      You claim that you see a world of empathy and mutual understanding coming, but you preclude understanding one like me, for I truly know God. For you to start by denying the mere possibility is to dehumanize me. Hardly seems like you offer a path of empathy and mutual understanding. Rather it sounds like a much more narrow, and dangerous bigotry than even the bigotry displayed by the various theistic religions over the centuries. Secularism is just more, and worse of the same.

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  15. I booed loudly because I found it disgusting that a man that has orchestrated the largest gutting of higher education funding sat in the stands and purported to support these two state universities. He deserved it.

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    1. It’s funny you would say that when spending on education has gone up every year he has been office, and will rise again next year. Don’t believe it? Look it up. You can’t believe everything you read in the mainstream media.

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  16. It is entirely ridiculous that the writer of this article singled out Christians as a group of people that acted disrespectful as if they are the only ones that should be held to higher expectations… It doesn’t matter whether we are Christian, atheist, Muslim, Buddhist, or Jewish. No matter your religion we are all human! And humans shouldn’t treat humans like this. Get off your high horse…

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  17. I’ve been a big supporter of your campaigns Rob. And I agree with some of what you said. But let me ask you this. How many Christians distributed those horrid pics and cartoons about Obama? How many Christians have used some of the foulest language against the man who holds the highest office in the free world? How many Christians had signs calling for the shooting or the hate of Obama. How many Christians called for Obama to be a failure in office knowing that if Obama failed it could cost us more kids in battle? How many Christians referred to Obama as a n*****? How about the vulgar language..how about the pics on the internet of Obama hanging from a tree? ”
    And here’s your quote
    ” But are you bold enough to stand up and exclaim that you don’t agree with him but that you will pray for him because he is the one God allowed to win the election? ” How many Christian republicans prayed for our president? So far to be honest…not many that I’ve heard. Those boos were for a reason…and even your republican allies in the senate know why there were boos. Obama has been called and referred to everything possible in a negative way. Have you prayed for obamas success? Have you prayed for the kids who finally got insured and when they got sick had insurance to save their lives? Have you prayed for the servicemen who Obama brought home alive? And when you heard someone say the nasty things about Obama did you preach the same words to them as you now preach about some boos to a governor. Have you ever seen what they did to Michelle. They booed Brownback…I couldn’t tell you who was next to him. But have you heard or seen the salacious/vile/racist comments directed to Michelle? And did you feel the same way toward her that you felt toward Mrs. Brownback. And did you say to those people that that was not the Christian way? You’re right. Not supporting our leaders is not right. But it’s not a one way street. I lok forward to when the AFA and Pat Robertson pray for our presidents success or even Gov. Brownbacks success. Instead of you seeing dark days ahead you’d forget the politics and realize what your “book” said to love they neighbor regardless of race/color/creed/religion and to feed the hungry and take care of the poor. That’s what being a real christen/jew/catholic or any other religion would strive to achieve.

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  18. When was the last time any of you Christians prayed for our President? Barack Obama is an elected official and I see Christians saying horrible things about him all day long.

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  19. Thanks for the inspiration friend! I’m using this verse today in worship with the girls. It is hard to pray for the king who is in charge of the corrupt government that let you be raped, trafficked, and exploited; that let the men that do these actions walk away. That is exactly what God called us to do, and this afternoon we are going to pray for the king, and the others in authority over us.

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  20. I read the article. I didn’t realize the booing was so loud from watching on television. During elections the side with the most money is able to drown out the opposition. Apparently those attending the K.U. v. Wichita State basketball game were not under the influence of campaign spending. I disagree if the writer is suggesting we should all bow down to Governor Sam Brownback.

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  21. Allow me to quote: “Obviously, the stadium wasn’t full of Christians” “behaving like spoiled brats”…. these are interesting, judgmental and highly sarcastic slams made by the “Christian” author of this article. Did you interview spectators to find out what their religious beliefs were, or are you passing judgement, and name calling? Are you passing judgement on your fellow Christians based on their actions rather than rising them up in prayer? Then, are you really resorting to name calling? The very act, you are speaking out against? Just curious, because I do also believe that there is a fairly important verse of our Bible that reads…. “Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, “Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye. Matthew 7: 1-5

    Now, with this said, I do have my own opinions regarding Mr. Brownback’s politics, policies, and about the events that occurred at this basketball game. However, it is not my place to pass judgement on any of those people. I am not their mother, their clergy, or their God. I can guide them and support them if and when asked. Do you truly find it beneficial to call them names?

    Words of wisdom… As a Christian… if you ever find yourself starting a sentence with… “If you were a good Christian… you might just be an oxymoron!”

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  22. All these postings relate to opinions on whether money should be spent here, there or for other causes. In truth, all these causes are extremely insignificant when compared with the willful killing of innocent babies through abortion. I am independent politically, but my first and most important voting consideration is whether or not a candidate supports this hideous killing and that it is killing no logical person can deny. If you doubt this, consider the simple fact that with today’s technology, in the later months of gestation, nearly all babies survive on their own if pulled from their mother into the world. So, go ahead and discuss these much lower priority things, if you must. As for me, I will never support any candidate that supports the obvious willful murder of innocent babies. Brownback and I agree on this. By the way, I do pray for all our leaders including those who support the murder of innocent babies.

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  23. People are dying because of this man’s policies and you want to talk about manners. The Christ who stormed the temple and excoriated the moneychangers would be ashamed of you. That you would cloak your support for this vile enemy of the tenets of Christian faith in piety is despicable.

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  24. Quote from Sister Joan Chittister, Benedictine Nun, Author & Speaker.
    “I do not believe that just because you’re opposed to abortion, that that makes you pro-life. In fact, I think, in many cases, morality is deeply lacking if all you want is a child born, but not a child fed, not a child educated, not a child housed. And why would I think that you don’t? Because you don’t want any tax money to go there. That’s not pro-life. That’s pro-birth. We need a much broader conversation on what the morality of pro-life is.”

    So, for all of you single issue voters that claim that our budget issues are insignificant…. how significant are our kids to you? I respect your choice to be an advocate for unborn babies, but if you want to claim to be pro-life, than you have to stick around and be an advocate for our kids to have a quality life and a quality education not just a birth!

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  25. Um, I believe ELECTED officials are to speak for the PEOPLE! I believe this would include Christians and NON-Christians! Correct? I’m not saying I don’t believe in God. I’m not saying you shouldn’t, I’m saying to each his own, but elected officials speak for all of the people and above all else the LAW. So without getting into arguments on who is doing what and why! This is America and people can chose to be non-Christians and show their dissatisfaction with a person they elected on his policies, which some may believe have changed between the campaign and now. I also believe to each his own, but Newspaper writers shouldn’t use the newspaper to publish their point of views, they should publish the news! Have a nice day!

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  26. I must be really stupid because I thought it was because of his shirt. Wichita St fans booed because he had KU on it and KU fans booed be cause he had Wichita St on it. I am so tired of all of the extreme views on religion and politics.

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  27. What is wrong with you people ? How can you think Brownback is a good christian ? What does your bible say about the sick and poor ? You guys must all have the new bible the one from the kochs . Protect the rich at all costs . The sick and poor are on there own . Do you guys see how the right wing and teabaggers are using you ? All someone has to say is I’m a christian and they can do whatever they want . Open your eyes. Most of you are in for a big surprise when god asked what you did to help your fellow man . All you will have is i helped the billionaires get richer . If Jesus were here your party would crucify him again and you guys would build the cross.

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  28. Religion has no place in politics.
    So please tell me why you are bringing religion in to this? This is what is wrong with the Republican Party. I am right winged btw, just can’t stand religion in politics

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  29. When those in authority abused their power, even Jesus went into the temple court and started screaming, waving sticks, and kicking over money changers’ tables. Following Jesus is not about being passive. It’s about standing with the powerless.

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  30. You’re right. I’ve often wondered myself how I would behave if I encountered a politician I dislike face to face. But I would hope it would be with dignity, grace and Christ’s love. Booing is no way to model Christ’s example and comparing it to the scene in the temple is twisting scripture. Booing is what a bunch of immature children do to bully someone they dislike and then they run off patting themselves on the back for “showing him”. Showing him what? That Christ died on the cross for him the same as for everybody else? There are ways to express disapproval of such people – writing letters, voting, etc. There’s a time for every purpose and in the middle of watching a game was the wrong time for expressing disapproval or dislike of an elected official.

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